American Women Veterans Organization

female soldier

by Levi Newman on June 30, 2011

We’d like to bring attention to an organization that we feel is especially noteworthy.  The American Women Veterans is a non-profit organization that started small, but has developed into a sophisticated team oriented toward “preserving and promoting the legacy of servicewomen, veterans, and their families.”

Funded by donations and supporters, and staffed by volunteers, the AWV is one of the strongest, non-partisan groups that advocates for our nation’s veterans.  They focus largely in spreading awareness throughout Congress of the sacrifices our women veterans have made and the dedication with which they persevere.

The mission, as stated by the AWV includes encouraging Congress to provide improved legislation in support of women veterans, providing retreats and conferences designed to build the strength of the community of women veterans and the communities in which they live.  Also addressed are goals to increase awareness in America’s communities of the positive contribution which women veterans have made to our society; not singling out any specific group, but advocating for women from all eras of war and all branches of service.

Still in the growing stages of becoming a national organization, AWV is largely working on its programs of advocacy and awareness, but their vision doesn’t end there.  Solid goals have been made to create healing and educational environments.  Also in the works is a transitional housing program.  One of the fastest growing homeless populations is women veterans, including those with children.  AWV is trying to work together with other organizations to create a transitional housing environment.  They want to build a sense of strength in community and teamwork that are lacking in the veteran community.

There are many more great things about this organization, and the best way to find out about them all is to visit their web page.  The site features news about the events that AWV is concerned with, as well as a reader’s blog which features content produced by women veterans and their families.

 

Photo thanks to DVIDSHUB under creative common license on Flickr.

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Cynthia A. Koehler July 2, 2011 at 2:52 pm

I, too, am a woman veteran. I was in the USAF, active duty 1974-1979, and 1982-1988. The break in service was because of a husband, now ex-, who threatened to kill me and my sons. I spent 1 year out and 1 year reserve; then I went back active. Anyway, I would like to join the AWV. I served at the tailend of the Vietnam Conflict, yet I am NOT considered a Vietnam vet because I did not serve in Vietnam. I think that stinks. I am 100% service connected disabled from MS that was diagnosed in service and I have MST PTSD from repeated rapes and beatings in service. My job was command post in the USAF, of which I loved it. I would not have traded it for anything in the world.

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meshell horton December 31, 2011 at 9:48 am

Thanks so much for the information.

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Meshell Horton July 17, 2011 at 7:16 pm

I just recently got diagnosed with MS January 2011. I am currently on National Guard status but I have been deployed twice in eight years to Iraq. I am 26 years old. Is there any thing I need to make sure that I bring up before I get Med boarded?

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Audrey Beebe July 18, 2011 at 1:31 pm

Meshell,

One thing that you definitely need to confirm and re confirm before you ETS is this: Often with a med board, you will get a severance check. BUT if you are planning to apply for disability compensation, you are very likely to be required to pay back that severance amount in full before receiving disability compensation. Additionally, the % rating that the med board gives you is not necessarily the same as what the VA will give you. The VA could increase or decrease that number.

If you are going to be receiving VA health care for your MS, or any other reason, it is best to use the pre-discharge program so that you have better communication with your local VA and a much better likelihood of receiving the care you need in a more timely fashion.

This article describes a bit about the pre-discharge program.

http://www.vabenefitblog.com/pre-discharge-program-helps-new-vets-move-from-servicemember-to-veteran/

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